rhyythms:

Nigerian Woman during Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Lagos, 1956

rhyythms:

Nigerian Woman during Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Lagos, 1956

(via thelittle9ja)

Here Comes Another One! New York Teen Kwasi Enin Accepted to All 8 Ivy League Colleges

goodblacknews:

Here Comes Another One! New York Teen Kwasi Enin Accepted to All 8 Ivy League Colleges

Kwasi Enin

Three days ago, Good Black News shared an article about Washington D.C. wunderkind Avery Coffey, who was accepted to five Ivy League colleges. Today, 17-year-old New Yorker, violist and aspiring…

cultureunseen:

Nneka Lucia Egbuna 
Born December 24, 1980 (age 33) and raised in Warri, (the Delta region of) Nigeria.
Composer, Activist, Poet, Musician, Philosopher and Powerhouse!

#nneka

(via afrobeatbuzz)

heeltheworld:

We are on again at 4:30 pm GMT. 
CNN African Start Ups.
We are still quite overwhelmed and grateful that this happened.  We could not have done it without you.

Follow your dreams, you never know when CNN will come and document them :)

#htw #empowerment #motivation #htworld #excellence #ghana #hardwork

heeltheworld:

We are on again at 4:30 pm GMT.
CNN African Start Ups.
We are still quite overwhelmed and grateful that this happened. We could not have done it without you.

Follow your dreams, you never know when CNN will come and document them :)

#htw #empowerment #motivation #htworld #excellence #ghana #hardwork

thatnigeriankid:

Wizkid - Joy / No Woman No Cry (Bob Marley Cover) in the 1Xtra Live Lounge (Lagos, Nigeria)

Wizkid dayo

(via afrobeatbuzz)

a-little-one-two-swag:

Ruff N Smooth - Dance For Me

(via afrobeatbuzz)

soundtrackamazing:

Fuse ODG - AZONTO Ft. Itz Tiffany & Donae’o

(via afrobeatbuzz)

amroyounes:

Whenever your faith in people is lost, remember these pictures.

(via blcvkamethyst)

aprocrastinatorsparadise:

crownprince81:

aleygrashouse:

ikaythegod:

Watch the exclusive full lecture here.

realest shit i ever seen on tumblr

My followers need to repost this. It needs to reach a lot of people.

PREACH.

(via blcvkamethyst)

notsohumble:

vivid-mindedempress:

Deep.

Deepest thing I’ve seen in a while.

notsohumble:

vivid-mindedempress:

Deep.

Deepest thing I’ve seen in a while.

(Source: africa-will-unite, via numbla)

nigerianwedding:

So beautiful @beautycookstudio ♡♡♡! #nigerianwedding #wedding #bride #nigeriantraditionalwedding #yorubabride #yorubawedding #asooke #coralbeads #coral #coraljewelry #smile #beautiful #redandwhiteasooke

nigerianwedding:

So beautiful @beautycookstudio ♡♡♡! #nigerianwedding #wedding #bride #nigeriantraditionalwedding #yorubabride #yorubawedding #asooke #coralbeads #coral #coraljewelry #smile #beautiful #redandwhiteasooke

(via numbla)

ourafrica:

Ola Orekunrin (@FlyingDrNigeria)  was studying to become a doctor in the UK a few years ago when her younger sister fell seriously ill while traveling in Nigeria. The 12-year-old girl, who’d gone to the West African country on holiday with relatives, needed urgent care but the nearest hospital couldn’t deal with her condition.

Orekunrin and her family immediately began looking for an air ambulance service to rapidly transport the girl, a sickle cell anemia sufferer, to a more suitable healthcare facility. They searched all across West Africa but were stunned to find out there was none in the whole region.

"The nearest one at the time was in South Africa," remembers Orekunrin. "They had a 12-hour activation time so by the time they were ready to activate, my sister was dead.

"It was really a devastating time for me and I started thinking about whether I should be in England talking about healthcare in Africa, or I should be in Africa dealing with healthcare and trying to do something about it."

Orekunrin did the latter. Motivated by the tragic death of her sister, the young doctor decided to leave behind a high-flying job in the UK to take to the Nigerian skies and address the vital issue of urgent healthcare in Africa’s most populous country.

A pioneering entrepreneur with an eye for opportunity, Orekunrin set up Flying Doctors Nigeria, the first air ambulance service in West Africa, transporting victims of medical emergencies, including industrial workers from the country’s booming oil and gas sector.

"There was a situation in Nigeria where there were only two or three very good hospitals and they were sometimes a two, three, four-day journey away from the places where incidents happened," says Orekunrin. "We also have a huge oil and gas industry and at that time there was no coordinated system for moving people from the offshore environment to a hospital to receive treatment."

We save lives by moving these patients and providing a high level of care en route.
Ola Orekunrin, Flying Doctors Nigeria

Currently in its third year, the Lagos-based company has so far airlifted about 500 patients, using a fleet of planes and helicopters to rapidly move injured workers and critically ill people from remote areas to hospitals.

"From patients with road traffic trauma, to bomb blast injuries to gunshot wounds, we save lives by moving these patients and providing a high level of care en route," says Orekunrin.

"Many of our roads are poorly maintained, so emergency transport by road during the day is difficult. At night, we have armed robbers on our major highways; coupled with poor lighting and poor state of the roads themselves, emergency transport by road is deadly for both patients and staff.

info via: CNN.com

Want to see The African Woman of The Day from other days? Click here

Happy Women’s History Month!

(Source: ourafrica)

sancophaleague:

There’s money on the floor, spray it spray it! There’s money on the floor, spray it, spray it! This is not balling but this is our culture. If there’s one thing I enjoy about being Nigerian is the parties. Beside the music and dancing, one thing that makes Nigerian parties so unique is “Spraying”.
The best way I can explain spraying is: making it rain, throwing bands in the air at a party! Bands to make her dance (lol). Seriously though spraying when is the guests of the party shower the celebrant and their family in money. This usually happens at wedding receptions and birthday parties. The music is playing people are dancing, while that is happening the celebrant is getting spraying with money.

When I was around 7 or 8. We threw a birthday party for my grandmother, as a little kid I had so much fun running around and dancing. No exaggeration after that party I walked out with $189 dollars from getting sprayed with money. The next day my parents took that money and said it was going to my “college tuition” (little did I know lol).

If you haven’t been to one yet, I recommend that you experience it one time in your life!

Post written by: @Oba_Tayo
“Omo Yoruba”

yagazieemezi:

A typical Igbo traditional wedding has two different ceremonies: 

The first one is called the ‘Iku Aka’ or ‘Knocking on the door’ where the groom and members of his family (uncles and brothers) come to tell the family of the bride of his intention to marry their daughter. The mother and father of the bride each get a keg of palmwine (ngwo) and one or more for the father’s Umunna (brothers, cousins, etc)

The second ceremony, referred to as the ‘Igba Nkwu Nwanyi/izu okwu’ (wine carrying ceremony) is the actual wedding. The groom is supposed to assist his in-laws-to-be with the planning of this ceremony so he can provide Assorted drinks, a cow, bags of rice and ingredients for cooking.

When they arrive, the groom and few family members join the father of the bride in private and discuss the ‘ima ego’ or dowry. Once this is done and accepted, the bride dances out for the first time. Accompanied by her friends  in her native attire of 2 separate pieces of George wrapper (one for her waist and the other for her bust) she goes to greet her mother’s people and goes back inside. Her second outfit is white blouse and George or damask or brocade which she uses to greet her father’s people and she goes back inside. The third outing is usually in material similar to the grooms, this time, she is handed a cup of wine and told to find her husband and give it to him to drink. When she finds him, she kneels to give him the horn and waits for him to finish. Sometimes, the groom might lift his bride up and give the rest of the wine. This usually indicates he understands she is his help mate and is accompanied by much cheering. The couple then kneel before the parents for prayers and blessings. Then the party really begins.

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

snapitoga:

Friday evening. Lagos Island, Lagos. 

snapitoga:

Friday evening. Lagos Island, Lagos.